Lung Diseases LD06, 2012 – 2017

RETRAC2: Research on Commercial Tobacco Reduction in Aboriginal Communities

Funding amount

$1.3 million

Duration

5 years

Background

In Canada, First Nations (on and off-reserve), Inuit and M├ętis Peoples have remarkably high rates of commercial tobacco use and associate chronic lung and other diseases compared to non-Aboriginal groups. RETRAC2 builds on a previous study (RETRAC1), where 7 Aboriginal communities conducted research to understand their community’s contexts of tobacco use and develop tailored community commercial tobacco reduction strategies. RETRAC1 included a systematic review of literature and studied Aboriginal communities around the world that had success in reducing commercial tobacco use. RETRAC2 provides opportunity for the 7 RETRAC1 communities to implement and evaluate their interventions and for 6 new Aboriginal communities to conduct community-based research, develop and begin to implement their own commercial tobacco reduction strategies.

Objectives

The overall purpose of this project (RETRAC2) is to contribute to knowledge about commercial tobacco control interventions that aim to prevent chronic lung diseases in Aboriginal communities in Canada. We will determine the effectiveness of tailored and evidence informed community-developed strategies in reducing commercial tobacco use and assess the implementation factors that contribute to their success.

Specific Objective 1: Determine the effectiveness of tailored and evidence informed community-developed strategies in reducing commercial tobacco use among Aboriginal populations in Ontario, Canada.

Specific Objective 2: Assess the implementation factors that contribute to success of community-developed strategies in reducing commercial tobacco use among Aboriginal populations in Ontario, Canada.

Specific Objective 3: Develop and disseminate a model for intervention development and implementation that can be sustained in Aboriginal communities in Ontario and beyond.

Principal Investigator

Robert M. Schwartz, University of Toronto

Funding organisations

  • Lung Diseases LD06
  • Canada
  • 2012 – 2017